Harvard Shows Cocoa Flavanols Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Death by 27%!

Groundbreaking results are in from COSMOS, Harvard’s massive study on cocoa flavanols. And wow, they’re gonna reshape nutritional guidelines and change the way we think about and consume cocoa and chocolate forever!

For the last four years, Harvard tracked 21,000 people as they consumed 500mg of cocoa flavanols daily in a placebo-controlled trial. Key topline findings include:

  • 27% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular death (jumps to 39% in participants consuming cocoa flavanols at least 22 days per month!)
  • 24% reduction in major cardiovascular events (heart attack, stroke, or death) among study participants consuming cocoa flavanols daily
  • 18% reduction in deaths, from all causes, among study participants consuming cocoa flavanols daily  

“We see promising signals that a cocoa flavanol supplement may reduce important cardiovascular events, including death from cardiovascular disease,” says Dr. Howard Sesso, ScD, MPH, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a principal investigator of COSMOS.

COSMOS is actually one of the largest, longest and most comprehensive placebo controlled trials of any drug, supplement or nutrient of all time. While initial COSMOS results are published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, these topline findings are only the beginning.

The FlavaBlog will continue to follow COSMOS results closely: Further data regarding blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar is expected in the coming months. And…COSMOS also spurred additional large ancillary studies on brain function, biological aging, performance and eye disease. These results should be published over the coming year. 

You can join the FlavaBlog here if you haven’t already, and enjoy being among the first to know the latest about the health benefits that FlavaFans are already reaping every day.

And head here to shop for decadent high flavanol cocoa powder, dark chocolate, mocha cold brew and chocolate oatmilk with flavanol levels equal to or greater than used in the breakthrough COSMOS study.